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Stuart England

The House of Stuart, alternatively spelled Stewart, was a royal house of England, although it was first a royal house of Scotland. The House of Stuart later went on to become a member of Great Britain. The origins of the name Stuart can be traced back to a hereditary Scottish title from ancient times, the High Steward of Scotland.
An interesting peice of information regarding the Stuarts is that while Mary Queen of Scots was in France, she took on the French spelling Stuart to make sure the name Stewart was pronounced correctly.

 

The origins of the earliest members of The House of Stuart can be traced back to the 11th century in Brittany. It was in the 12th century though that a member of the family served under David I of Scotland and subsequently received the title of steward. The 6th steward in the family later married the daughter of King Robert I (also known as Robert the Bruce) and in 1371; the child born out of this union became crowned the first Stewart king of Scotland. This king was known as Robert II and he ruled Scotland from 1371 to 1390.

After Robert II, there followed a long line of Stewarts during the 15th to the 17th centuries, among them James I, James II, James III, James IV, Mary Queen of Scots and James VI. James VI later ascended to the English throne and was dubbed James I.

The House of Stuart was the designated ruling house of The Kingdom of Scotland for approximately 336 years, from 1371 to 1707. After Queen Elizabeth I of England (who was the last reigning monarch of the House of Tudor) died, the House of Stuart went on to rule the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Ireland. Between the years 1603 and 1707 then, the three kingdoms (Scotland, England and Ireland) were ruled by members of the House of Stuart under a personal union between the three heads of state. It was at this time that the House of Stuart dubbed themselves the Kings/Queens of Great Britain, although no such political entity actually existed. In fact, it wasn't until the last monarch of The House of Stuart, Queen Anne, that the Kingdom of Great Britain was politically united under a common monarch. Queen Anne was previously the reigning monarch of the separate kingdoms of Scotland and England and she ruled the newly established Kingdom of Great Britain until her death in 1714.

After the rule of The House of Stuart, Great Britain came under the rule of the House of Hanover.

Currently the original Stuart clan is still in existence as well as several cadet and illegitimate branches of the family.

The House of Stuart is distinguished by a long line of illustrious rulers from the early ages of the Dapifers of Dol, to the High Stewards of Scotland, the Scottish Monarchs, the English and Scottish Monarchs all the way to the Monarchs of Great Britain. From 1701 to 1807 there have also been a few Jacobite Claimants to the throne.

Original Authors:Doods Pangburn
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 26/02/2007



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