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Anglo-Saxon (410-1066 AD)

 

Anglo-Saxons is a term that is commonly used to describe a group of people who lived in Great Britain since the 5th century. The Anglo-Saxons were speakers of Germanic languages, and they are comprised of the Frisians, Jutes, Saxons, and Angles. This group of people began their rise in power once the Roman Empire had been largely diminished. Historians are currently debating the extent to which the Anglo-Saxons displaced the native population. While some say that this group totally displaced the natives who were living in the region, others say they were primarily responsible for making contributions to the existing culture. The percentage of the population in Great Britain that spoke Germanic languages during this time is unknown. However, Germanic speaking soldiers were frequently employed by the Romans.

Many of these people were present in Great Britain, and it is likely that their cultures began to merge over time. Some historians believe that the true rise of the Anglo-Saxons began with Alfred the Great. It was during the 10th century that the Anglo-Saxon presence in the area became pronounced. The actual term "Anglo-Saxon" can be found in many writings from this time period. The term "Anglo" is derived from the word "Angles," which were a group of people who lived in the northern region of the country. The term "Saxon" is used to describe those who came from the region of Old Saxony.

Many of the writers of this time did not make clear distinctions between the two groups. It should also be noted that the term "Anglo-Saxon" was also a part of Old English. This language was spoken in Britain before the arrival of the Normans, a group of people who spoke French. Despite this, many historians feel that the modern customs and political culture in England originated from the Anglo-Saxons rather than the Normans. However, finding the actual connections for this has been a great challenge to historians. While many people may think that the term Anglo-Saxon refers to an ethnic group, this two is the subject of debate among historians. Some people feel that this term is not useful because of the many other groups that were present in England during this time, while others say it is of significant importance.

It is very likely that the Danes and Normans became mixed with the Anglo-Saxon culture. Over time, it would become more difficult to tell the difference between these groups.

Original Authors: Stephen Palmer
Edit Update Authors: M.A.Harris
Updated On: 23/07/2008



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