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Normans in Scotland

One of the people who opposed William's right to the English throne was Edgar Atheling. He left the country for Scotland, and his sister married the Scottish king Malcolm Canmore. This created a conflict between Malcolm and William, and William had already contested the southern border of the country. William I would invade Scotland in 1072, and his armies would move as far as the Firth of Tay. Malcolm did not mount a large amount of resistance, and he paid homage to William. He would even go as far as give up his son as a hostage. Arguments begin to surface regarding the right of the Scottish King to give loyalty and homage to the English throne.

The Normans would eventually establish a number of prominent families in Scotland, and they built castles as well. One of the kings that resulted from this is Robert the Bruce. A number of powerful Scottish clans would be formed as well, and they were present within the Highlands. Perhaps one of the most prominent people responsible for bringing Norman culture to Scotland was David I, who became king of the country. The procedure of bringing Norman culture to Scotland continued after David's reign. In addition to the clans that were present in the Highlands, the Norman feudal process was heavily promoted in the Scottish Lowlands. It should also be noted that the effects of the Normans on the Lowland Scots language was not well pronounced.

The word Scoto-Norman is used to refer to Normans who created a strong bond with Scotland during the Middle Ages. In addition to Normans, French and the Flemish are included in this category as well. A mixture of Gaelic and French culture was present in this group. Historians consider the kings who reigned between David I and Steward to be Scoto-Norman rulers. Another example of the mixture between French and Gaelic culture is Lochlann, Lord of Galloway. A number of historians are now using the word Scoto-Norman when referring to the influence of Normans in Scotland.

Original Authors: Stephen Palmer
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 11/04/2007



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