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It was said by many people in the Modern Era that England was a land without any music. This of course was untrue as there were many forms of popular types of music that could be heard all throughout England during the 19th century. Seeing as though the Modern Era covered the better part of the Edwardian period as well as all of the Victorian period, there was music everywhere from the dance halls and music halls to the streets and even in the public parks. From orchestras plating the classics and even many new pieces at the time to the new brass bands that made it onto the main stage in England’s parks and city streets, there was always some great music to be found during this period of time.

Educators, philanthropists as well as moral crusaders began to utilise the concept of music as a means to help instil thoughts and memories into one’s mind. It was during this time that a great number of children’s songs which are still sung today were written and first used to better one’s education. There were a vast number of musical instruments and musical collaborations created in this time period. So much so that again has so much music been in the lives of the English.

As a means of improving congregational psalmody the English began to call upon musical educators to help improve it. Soon after, these musical educators began to look into the successful practice of these concepts being utilised in Germany. A small collection of various German didactic songs were used in the active development of the curriculum in various musical schools.

As the Industrial Revolution moved forward, and more people found themselves in the centre of highly industrialised cities, the concept of the Bass Brand soon began to spring up all over England. Furthermore, there was also an increase in the collecting of various folk music as it was rapidly changing and reforming as new idioms and lingo became popular.

Many new music halls began to spring up which played many different types of music. While some of these new music halls focused on a particular type of music, others found themselves offering a variety of music to help cover the many different tastes of the working class.

Along with the Industrial Revolution was also the advent of the ability to transfer sound into electrical impulses which at first was just the telegraph, by the end of the Modern Era the first telephone communication occurred. So with the advent of the ability to turn sound into electrical signals the movement of sound recordings became more popular. It was not uncommon that by the end of the Modern Era many of the common folk began to be approached by various composers to record new songs. This basically led to the beginning of the recording artist and the first major recording studios.

Original Authors: Nick (Globel Team)
Edit Update Authors: M.A.Harris
Updated On: 18/07/2008



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