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The Life of George III

George III whose full name was George William Frederick held separate titles as King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from October 5, 1760 until January 1, 1801. From January 1801 he held the title of King of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in January 1820. At the time he held these various titles, George also held further titles as Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg as well as Elector and later King of Hanover when the Electorate became the Kingdom of Hanover on October 12 of the year 1814.

The third in the line of Hanoverian monarchs who ascended to the throne of Great Britain, George III was the first to speak English as a first language and the first one to be born in Britain. George III in fact never even visited Germany.

George III was born on June 4, 1738 to Frederick Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, in Norfolk House. His father and grandfather George II had a very tempestuous relationship for many long years and when the Prince of Wales died in 1751 from a lung injury, George was bestowed the title Duke of Edinburgh.

As his father had already passed on, George was the heir apparent to the throne of Great Britain and to this end; he was crowned the Prince of Wales on the same year that his father died. When George II died October 25 of 1760, the crown then passed on to George III.

George III's reign as King of England was marred by the loss of many of Great Britain's colonies in North America during the American Revolution. These rebel colonies would eventually band together to form the United States of America. Back home in England, the formerly separate countries of Great Britain and Ireland were finally joined together to form the United Kingdom.

During George III's reign, in the midst of the American Revolution, many charges of autocracy were levelled against him, particularly by the Whig political party. Things were not much better in the colonies at all as the Declaration pf Independence was passed which contained among other things a long list of perceived offences of the King.

Although George was a fairly well respected and well-loved monarch in his own country, he was much les popular in the former colonies, which now made up the United States. Many blamed him for the political problems that beleaguered the country. His reputation in Ireland was equally unfavourable because of numerous injustices committed in the country during the suppression of the 1798 rebellion.

George III lived out the latter years of his life with recurring spells of mental illness, which eventually became permanent. His condition was so severe that after a particularly severe attack in 1810, his son George the Prince of Wales was appointed to the role of Prince Regent over the entire Kingdom. George III's mental and physical condition gradually continued to deteriorate and when he died, George the Prince of Wales took over the throne and held reign as George IV.

Original Authors: Doods Pangburn
Edit Update Authors: M.A.Harris
Updated On: 21/07/2008



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