Ancestry: History: Celts: Roman Influence:

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Celts Roman Influence

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Roman Influence on Celts

The Romans had influenced the Celts greatly in terms of religion. The Celts used to have their own set of ancient gods and goddesses. But when the Romans conquered them, their whole religion and belief system was destroyed. Instead of worshiping their own gods, they adopted that of the Romans and somehow just integrated the gods of their forefathers with them.

Aside from Christianity, the Celtic culture had also been tainted with a Roman influence. An evidence of this is the social economic standard followed by the Romans, which incidentally was subconsciously introduced to the Celts. Much of a Roman's life was centred on the cultural ways of urban life. Their existence was bent into the observation of public events that were mostly luxurious in nature, like that of the Roman baths. Part of these ways was inherited by the Celts.

The Roman's architectural magnificence is another example of an influence on Celts. Romans tended to build lavish courtyards with colonnaded designs and tectonic frescoes. More so, most edifices were adorned by sculptures that were considered unique to Roman civilization. There were also pictures engraved in walls and these were all evidences of the rich Roman culture that brushed off on the Celts.

The construction of amphitheaters and aqueducts became common too, with a number of them rising in Gaullic territories like Arles, Nimes, Lyon, Paris, and Saintes. As for Aqueducts, the best examples would be Pont du Gard and the Barbegal aqueduct. But aside from these, roads were ceaselessly built. This included the construction of Via Domitia, the first Roman road ever to be built in Gaul. The Romans believed that roads were of essence if they want to build and expand their empire, for it allowed them to move in battalions. These, along with the others, are the major influences of Roman to Celts and the other Gaullic region in general.

Original Authors: Jennifer Tumanda
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 25/01/2007



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