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Celts Mythology

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Celtic Mythology

If there is one thing that Celtics had greatly influenced, in the context of human culture, that would be their magnificent story-telling prowess, as manifested in their literature. It goes without saying that the Celtic literature created a very powerful picture of the culture, art and traditions of the Celtics. Celtic mythology is basically categorized in to three groups: Goidelic, Insular Brythonic and Continental Brythonoc.

Celtic Mythology is basically related to the medieval manuscripts of Wales and Ireland. Live witnesses of this kind of literature are accounted by famous people including Julius Caesar himself. There are a number of testimonials that attests to the religious, almost magical, correlations of Celtic beliefs and traditions into its literature, which is in existence even before the birth of Christ.

Irish mythology is one of the more popular and oldest medieval literature that relates to the Celtics. Christians were said to have written down these tales. The basic plot of Irish mythology is the war between the divine empires of Fomorians and Tuatha De Danann. The famous Battle of Mag Tuireadh is often the most remembered part of the mystic story. It's the usual account of good versus evil. Tuatha De represents the craftsmanship and leadership while Formorian exudes uncultivated nature. Popular characters of Irish mythology include the Dagda, the Morrigan, Lug and other gods and goddesses.

The nature of Celtic mythology is basically animistic. A belief that souls and supernatural being are present in nature and inanimate objects. There is the present of a tutelary goddess who basically governed fertility and life all throughout its people. The male god is always a symbol of power and divinity. Male gods relate to their people in a more physical and intimate manner, as they were the looked upon by tribes.

The most evident characteristic of Celtic mythology is the role of animal symbolism in the make up of its literature. They portray animals in almost-sacred form, that is integral in the balance of nature and human life.

The existence and acknowledgement of the 'other world' is also a concept that is greatly connected to Celtic mythology. The 'other world' is said to be a point of entry that connects humanity and the magical and vague dimensions of another world.

Today, there are a number of movies and modern novels that hail inspiration from the magnificent mythology of the Celts. This only proves the classic beauty of such literature, ancient-old yet timeless.

Original Authors: Jennifer Tumanda
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 25/01/2007



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