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Brythonic
Continental
Goidelic

Celtic Languages

Past generations had bestowed humanity with a lot of things; art, culture and tradition are some of these, but most importantly they’ve handed down their very own language. Celtic language has been around for centuries and was commonly spoken in most areas in Western Europe during and before the Roman era. It is widely used in British Isles and in North-western France.

The Celtic language is said to be a part of the Indo-European language. The Hellenistic period proved to be the height of the Celtic language as it spread throughout Iberian Peninsula, West Europe, and Asia Minor. At the time of the Roman Empire, Latin outgrew the use of the Celtic language. The end of the Celtic language was said to have happen sometime in the 5th century, especially in parts of continental Europe.

The pronunciation and phonetics of the Celtic language are quite complicated. The final sound of a certain word usually carries on the initial phonetic consonant sound of the next word. The Celtic language usually lacks a present participle and verbal nouns in most of its sentence construction, similar to that of the Egyptian language. The position of a verb at the beginning of a sentence is also notable. Some English words that derive from this origin include whiskey, slogan, crock, bard and blarney, among others.

Celtic language has great dynamism and it is generally categorized into three divisions:

  • Continental
  • Brythonic
  • Goidelic

Original Authors: Jennifer Tumanda
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 16/01/2007



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