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Celts Celtic Knot

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Celtic Knot

If there is one icon that would instantly identify the grandeur and the classic beauty of the art of Celts, then that would be the Celtic knot. The Celtic knot is one of the most popular motifs associated with Celtic art. It is often reflected in their jewellery, stone art, metal works and various other artworks.

The Celtic knots are evident in the illuminated manuscripts. They are also seen in almost all places where the Celts travelled and inhabited. The Celtic knot has delicate and intricate sketches of twists and turns that created a beautiful symmetry.

The interwoven designs are called plaits and are similar to artworks found in Europe that date back 6th century. The art behind the Celtic knot might have had some Norse influence since Celts adopted ideas from the people whom they interacted with or who conquered them. Early proofs of the existence of the Celtic knot are evident in the Gospel Book, which was created during the 7th century in Britain.

Knots, in historical context, were once thought to ward off evil spirits. Since knots are believed to be a symbol of protection, Celtic knots are often used as charms and talismans. The Wiccans also interpreted the Celtic knot as something that holds some sort of magical properties.

Although Celtic art greatly relates to animism and spiritual symbolism, there has been no concrete meaning to this unique Celtic symbol. They have seemed to lost their meaning over the years. A lot of historical experts can relate the continuous loops of the Celtic knot as a symbol of infinity and interconnectivity.

Modern art has captured the intriguing pattern of the Celtic knot. This is evident in modern architecture that we see today in our churches and home designs. The same designs are also seen on tiles, textile patterns, handicrafts and a lot more.

Original Authors: Jennifer Tumanda
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 16/01/2007



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