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In This Category Celtic Art
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Celtic Art

One of the great things that the Celts are known for is their art. Celtic art is a great manifestation of the beauty of symmetry and symbolism. The intriguing part of any Celtic art is the complexity and the intricate details of the symbols it incorporates in its artworks. It has in them the classic interpretation of the sign and figure of 6th century art.
Celtic art is one of the prime artworks of the medieval period. It comes in various forms that are influenced by a number of people and the era of that time. Periodic eras depict some of the emotions that are dramatically transformed into their art.

Celtic art is largely associated with ancient Celtic societies and Celtic-speaking European peoples of different ethnic descent from the Iron Age to the Modern Period. The strong presence of Celtic art influence were also discovered in pre-historic societies with unverified language, but whose culture and stylistics have strong Celtic elements.

Celtic art has three known “traditions” – continental Iron Age art, Iron Age in Ireland and Britain and Insular art. The earliest tradition, continental Iron Age, is largely associated with the La Tené culture which emerged and flourished during the latter part of the Iron Age. Art pieces attributed to this period bore the strong influence of Mediterranean culture such as that of ancient Greek tribes and Etruscan societies.

The second tradition of Celtic art was largely based on the ancient culture of British and Ireland during the Iron Age. The art tradition is defined by dominant continental stylistics with distinct regional character. It was during this period where the Book of Kells and other Celtic masterpieces were produced.

The third Celtic art tradition, Insular art, is considered as the renaissance phase of the Middle Ages largely in Ireland and some parts of Britain. It is defined by the mixture of Celtic elements combined with influences of other ethnic cultures. Celtic art, as what we know today, were mainly inspired by the ancient art forms which are associated to this third tradition.

Original Authors: Jennifer Tumanda
Edit Update Authors: RPN
Updated On: 23/02/2010



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